Background

I’m the product of misfits, vagabonds, cultural entrepreneurs, lovers and creators of art, music, dance and history… who’ve all raised and mentored me...

I understand the value of being in front of the camera as much as I relish the process involved with everything that happens behind the camera...

I began as a child performer in Jamaica with the Little People Teen Players & Ashe Caribbean Performing Ensembles and evolved into a recording artist, performer and writer in New York. I’ve appeared in the NBC hit series 30 Rock, the ABC series Going to Extremes and the films The Ridge, Where Truth Lies and The Breeding. Among my stage credits: Angel in the hit Broadway show RENT; a world premiere of Kwame Armah’s One Love, the Bob Marley musical, at Centerstage; Mama, I Want to Sing starring Melba Moore and Chuck Cooper at New World Stages, in addition to other major theatrical productions across the USA such as Dreamgirls, Hello Dolly, West Side Story, All Shook Up; my debut album ‘Groove’ was followed by a brief singer/songwriter recording contract with Columbia Records. I’ve also been in numerous commercials including the Jamaica Tourist Board’s ‘One Love’ campaign, national commercials for GAP and VH1, as well as national print campaigns for Metro PCS, Target, LaCoste, and Kenneth Cole Reaction...

Now, as a writer, director and actor with a unique Afro-Jamaican perspective, my work explores how themes of sexuality, identity, conflict, struggle, policing, repressed emotions, love, civil and human rights, and the different ways that tradition versus modernity influence both cultural and historical context inspire contemporary progression. My current films projects, NYC Confessions and For Little Girls Who Are Afraid To Speak are a part of a broader retrospective discourse on the ways rape in society affects the masculine and feminine cultures. Both are dramatic narrative projects that examines the effects of social class, identity, ethnicity, sexuality and survival through the lens of unlikely heroes— the “others” in society.


One Love, 
Ano Okera.